Camel Dive Club & Hotel
Centre of Na'ama Bay
Sharm El Sheikh
South Sinai, Egypt
Telephone: +20-69-3600700
Email:
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Wreck diving

Wreck diving

Many of the Red Sea's most famous wreck diving sites are located within easy sailing distance of Sharm el Sheikh.

We schedule boat trips several times per week to the world-renowned World War II shipwreck SS Thistlegorm, which may be reached in approximately three hours. The steamship SS Dunraven is another popular wreck both for its history and marine life. Weather permitting, it is also possible to dive on several lesser known wrecks around the Straits of Tiran and Ras Mohamed National Park.

Thistlegorm

The world famous wreck SS Thistlegorm was sunk in 1941 in the area of Sha'ab Ali in the Gulf of Suez. She was packed to the gunwales with a cargo of supplies destined for the British fifth army based in Alexandria. Armoured Bren-Gun carriers, BSA motorcycles, jeeps, trucks, rolling stock, aeroplane parts, stacks of rifles, radio equipment, munitions, and a plentiful supply of Wellington boots can all be seen during your dive.

The Thistlegorm is heaven for wreck enthusiasts, but is also one of the most underrated fish dives in the area, attracting schooling barracuda and providing a hunting ground for giant tuna and snapper. Our excursions require an early start. After breakfast on board, you will make two dives on the wreck.

Dunraven

Another popular wreck is the Dunraven, a Victorian steam and sail ship that was carrying spices, cotton and timber from India. The ship hit the reef after an allegedly drunken dispute involving the Captain, his wife, and his First mate, and caught on fire. It sank in 30m of water beside the reef, upside down. The shipwreck has been underwater since 1876, more than 130 years.

Its contents were stripped of by a team of archaeologists in the 80s. Now it resembles a large cave. Inside divers can find schools of yellow goat fish and Giant morays. Due to its long time underwater the hull that is on the top is encrusted with corals and full of marine life, such as schools of bat fish, nudibranchs, pipe fish and the very rare ghost pipe fish.

Other wrecks
Liveaboards are able to access wrecks which the daily boats cannot reach. Check our section on diving safaris for information on some alternative wreck dives and for pure wreck safaris.

How to book

We normally schedule wreck diving excursions at least once per week. However, as they depend on good weather and require a minimum number of people, we cannot guarantee your excursion on a specific day. We recommend you sign up at the dive centre on your first day, or ask your dive guide, so we can inform you of the next available trip.

Please note:
Minimum of 20 dives required. We have recently implemented new mooring procedures for diving the SS Thistlegorm. Our aim is to preserve the fragile condition of the wreck whilst maintaining our usual safety standards for our guests and staff. In the event that none of the designated mooring points are available, our instructors shall need to abort the dive and choose alternative dive sites. In this case you will not be charged the Thistlegorm supplement.

Supplements

SS Thistlegorm including breakfast,
lunch and unlimited soft drinks:
€80.00
Dunraven (excluding Ras Mohammed National Park fee): €35.00
Ras Mohammed National Park fee (per entry): €5.00

Enquire

Dives are made with a dive guide. Tanks and weights are included. In addition to Ras Mohammed fees, Egyptian authorities may charge fees for visiting certain other sites.These rates are added to the daily diving charge.
Camel Dive Club & Hotel
Centre of Na'ama Bay
Sharm El Sheikh
South Sinai, Egypt
Telephone: +20-69-3600700
Email:
Skype with Camel

Download our vCard